Scott Sports

The All-NEw Genius

Ready for ANY TRAIL, ANY TIME

Head to the bottom of this article to read our First Ride review

The SCOTT Genius has sat at the core of our trail bike collection for the last decade. More than ever, the Genius embodies our Innovation, Technology, Design ethos.First introduced in 2003, the birth of the Genius marked the start of a cult and manifested SCOTT’s position as an innovation driver in the full-suspension segment. Each iteration of the Genius platform in 2009, 2013 and 2018 respectively raised the bar by introducing technologies and innovations still seen industry wide today.

Throughout, the Genius has always remained true to its DNA: an ultimate trail bike wrapped in a lightweight and versatile package ready for ANY TRAIL, ANY TIME.Smart Suspension, Smarter Features and our Smartest Design yet lead to an unbelievable trail bike that just can’t get enough, no matter whether you’re conquering high alpine trails or shredding single track with your buddies.

First Ride and Release: The New Scott Genius

INTEGRATED SUSPENSION TECHNOLOGYThe new Genius applies our patented Integrated Suspension Technology. Not only does this make for a fantastic looking bike, but it also allows us to improve the bike’s suspension performance. Primarily, we can engineer frames with a lower center gravity, resulting in better handling, and a more stable, confidence-inspiring ride for the end user. Additionally, the frame’s construction is stiffer around the BB, which reduces unnecessary movements laterally to the direction of the shock’s travel. It goes without saying that the shock is also protected from debris and the elements, two of the main enemies when it comes to shock performance.

SAGSetting sag and checking travel use is easier than ever before with the new Genius. An external indicator on the link allows the end user to easily set sag and to see how much travel they’re using.

GEOMETRYThis 29” wheel size specific frame features 150mm of rear suspension paired with a 160mm fork. The new Genius platform has been tailored to the demands of the modern trail bike. We’ve utilized an intelligent application of slacker, longer and lower with an even more capable geometry than its predecessor. We wanted a Genius that continued to excel going up the hill, while having all the tools necessary for an even better time down to the valley floor. As is the case with many of our mountain bikes, head angle is adjustable. The bike comes with headset cups that allow you to choose between a 64 or 65 degree head angle.

With this bike’s predecessor, we already had a solid suspension platform to work with. Changes to shocks and the amount of capability expected in this category have led to an increase in progression and optimization of the kinematic. What we end up with is a classic Genius vibe perfect for all day epics and add to that a solid pinch of party for when the trail points downward.

GENIUS vs GENIUS STWe’re introducing the Genius in two different formats, Genius 900 and Genius Super Trail, or “ST.” Our all-new Genius 900 platform takes the tradition of versatile trail bikes and delivers a package that is ideal for any trail, any time, while the ST is tailored to more aggressive riding. While both of these bikes run the same frame layout, they have very unique characters. At the heart of both layouts is our NUDE shock platform, which has been a preeminent feature of the Genius family for over a decade. You’ll find the NUDE 5T shock on the Genius 900, and a brand-new addition to the NUDE Family on the Genius ST – the Float X NUDE from FOX. With this shock, we apply our unique in-house technologies to a platform that suits even more aggressive riding.

In terms of geometry, the main difference between both platforms is the head angle. The Genius 900 comes stock with a 65-degree head angle, while the Genius ST comes in with a slacker 64 degree head angle. Now of course, with our angle adjust headset that is available on both models, you can play around with this to see what suits you best. Each version has a different approach with regards to spec, ultimately resulting in two different characters on the trail.

First Ride and Release: The New Scott GeniusFirst Ride and Release: The New Scott Genius

COCKPITThe Genius features a Hixon Cockpit from Syncros which has undergone a redesign, with refined ergonomics for both backsweep and upsweep, two options for rise depending on frame size (15mm and 25mm) and two stem lengths. Multiple options exist for computer mounts, lights, etc. with the possibility to mount on the stem cap but also out the front of the bar using two threaded inserts. All cables flow neatly under the bar and into the headset leading to a clean, clutter free cockpit. Speaking of headset, swapping head angle is easy. Just take off your cockpit, remove headset cups, rotate them each 180 degrees, and reassemble. No need to cut any cables or bleed any brakes. Cable integration is not exclusive to the one-piece cockpits though.

First Ride and Release: The New Scott Genius

SCOTT ALLOYAlongside our carbon models, the 2023 Genius and Genius ST will be available as a hybrid version featuring a carbon mainframe and alloy rear triangle, and also as complete alloy versions. The Genius alloy offers a similar advanced riding experience by further sharing the same geometry and kinematics. This truly high-end aluminum frame further offers the same design, same advanced level of integration and all the technological features of the Carbon Genius like internal cable routing, SAG indicator, downtube cover for easy shock access, headset adjustment, chain guide, etc.

First Ride and Release: The New Scott Genius

THE GENIUS PRODUCT RANGEThe new Genius will be available as carbon, hybrid and alloy models. In total the collection features 10 models for Genius 900 and ST including 2 dedicated Contessa models. Discover the full collection on SCOTT-sports.com

The Genius ST Range

First Ride and Release: The New Scott Genius

Scott Genius ST 920

Price: $TBC

Frame: Genius Alloy 6061
Fork: Rockshox Lyrik Air, Rush RC
Shock: Fox Float X NUDE PE EVOL w/Piggy Back

Groupset: SRAM NX/SX 12spd (11-50T)
Cranks: SRAM SX Eagle DUB (32T)
Brakes: Sram DB8 4 piston (200/180 mm)

Wheelset: Syncros X-30S/Formula
Front Tire: Maxxis Minion DHF 29×2.6″ Maxxterra, EXO
Rear Tire: Maxxis Dissector 29×2.6″ Maxxterra, EXO

Handlebar: Syncros Hixon 2.0 Alloy
Stem: Syncros AM 2.0
Seatpost: Syncros Duncan Dropper
Saddle: Syncros

First Ride and Release: The New Scott Genius

Scott Contessa Genius ST 910

Price: $TBC

Frame: Genius Carbon HMF Mainframe, Alloy 6061 Swingarm
Fork: Fox 36 Float Performance Elite
Shock: Fox Float X NUDE PE EVOL Piggy Back

Groupset: SRAM GX Eagle AXS 12spd (10-52T)
Cranks: SRAM GX Eagle DUB (30T)
Brakes: Shimano XT M8120 (203/180 mm)

Wheelset: Syncros Revelstoke 2.0
Front Tire: Maxxis Minion DHF 29×2.6″ Maxxterra, EXO
Rear Tire: Maxxis Dissector 29×2.6″ Maxxterra, EXO”

Cockpit: Syncros Hixon iC Carbon Bar/Stem
Seatpost: Syncros Duncan Dropper Post
Saddle: Syncros Savona 2.0 V-Concept

First Ride and Release: The New Scott Genius

Scott Genius ST 910

Price: $TBC

Frame: Genius Carbon HMF Mainframe, Alloy 6061 Swingarm
Fork: Ohlins RFX36 m.2 Air
Shock: Fox Float X NUDE PE EVOL Piggy Back

Groupset: SRAM GX Eagle AXS 12spd (10-52T)
Cranks: SRAM GX Eagle DUB (30T)
Brakes: Shimano XT M8120 (203/180 mm)

Wheelset: Syncros Revelstoke 2.0
Front Tire: Maxxis Minion DHF 29×2.6″ Maxxterra, EXO
Rear Tire: Maxxis Dissector 29×2.6″ Maxxterra, EXO”

Cockpit: Syncros Hixon iC Carbon Bar/Stem
Seatpost: Syncros Duncan Dropper Post
Saddle: Syncros

First Ride and Release: The New Scott Genius

Scott Genius ST 900 Tuned

Price: $TBC

Frame: Genius Carbon HMX
Fork: Fox 36 Factory Grip2
Shock: Fox Float X NUDE Factory EVOL Piggy Back

Groupset: SRAM X01/GX AXS (10-52T)
Cranks: SRAM X01 DUB Eagle Carbon (32T)
Brakes: Shimano XTR M9120 (200/180 mm)

Wheelset: Syncros Revelstoke 1.0 Carbon
Front Tire: Maxxis Minion DHF 29×2.6″ Maxxterra, EXO
Rear Tire: Maxxis Dissector 29×2.6″ Maxxterra, EXO

Cockpit: Syncros Hixon iC Carbon bar/stem
Seatpost: Syncros Duncan Dropper Post
Saddle: Syncros Tofino 1.5

First Ride and Release: The New Scott Genius

FIRST RIDE

THE NEW Scott Genius ST

First Ride by Robert Johnston

For the launch of the new Genius, Scott invited us to join them in Aosta, Italy, to spend some time on the bike and learn about its development. As part of this we had two decent days riding on the bike, with a good mix of climbing and descending that allowed for a good initial impression to be formed. The setup of the Genius ST 900 Tuned I was testing proved to be fairly simple, helped by the lack of bar roll adjustment possible and the comfortable position that the Syncros Hixon integrated cockpit mercifully provided me with. I was on an XL Genius, which is larger than I’d normally ride with its 515mm reach compared with the  475-495mm range I’d typically aim for. Things were of course more stretched out, but thankfully it was within the realms of comfortable for my 6’2″ (189cm) stature. Setting sag was made simple thanks to the seatstay indicator, and accessing the shock adjustments through the hatch was as easy as on most single pivot bikes, never mind bikes with shock tunnels or complex multi-links, though it’s easiest to flip the bike upside down to do so. Once everything was aired up and feeling about right in the carpark, it was time to hit the Aosta Valley trails.

First Ride and Release: The New Scott Genius

The initial ride consisted of a shuttle followed by a solid 800m climb, before we descended 1800m back down to Aosta. The climb was certainly a good chance to get familiar with the pedaling performance of the Genius ST, play with the Tracloc system and warm up the brain before the huge descent ahead. Out the gate it was clear that the low system weight, especially with the Syncros carbon wheels, produced a bike that was keen to get going off the line with minimal resistance. With the wide 2.6” but thin EXO carcass tires; carbon rims and unfamiliar trails, tire pressures began on the cautious side at 26PSI front and 30 out back, which gave very little compliance to the terrain below and made for a relatively uncomfortable ride. Once I learned to trust that lowering the pressure a few PSI wouldn’t lead to immediate self destruction, things improved both in terms of rolling speed and comfort on the slightly rough sections of fireroad.

The Tracloc’s middle “Ramp Control” setting made limited difference to the climbing feel, but a further flick into the “Climb” mode instantly firmed things up in a dynamic scenario and lifted the bottom bracket. That said, on the fireroad climb it didn’t offer much improvement in terms of the feeling of efficiency – there’s plenty of anti squat on the Genius to handle that, so I’d have to wait until a technical climb to figure out the useful scenario for the Tracloc system.

First Ride and Release: The New Scott Genius

As it turns out, I found the Ramp Control setting’s calling before I reached a technical climb. Riding a section of trail flat out, I noticed Brendan Fairclough hitting some compressions hard ahead, and figured it would be the perfect moment to flick it into ramp control and feel the increased progression. Sure enough, it did exactly as claimed, keeping the bike more composed and preventing it from finding its way fully towards the bottom out bumper. However, the setup of the bike with a hair under 30% sag likely didn’t demand this increased progression for the typical riding I’d expect to undertake on the Genius. There wasn’t the most incredibly plush ride on offer, instead remaining composed and planted but letting you know a lot of what was going on below, so perhaps a slightly more sag-rich approach could do some favors.

It was only in retrospect that I realized exactly how descending on board the Tracloc-equipped Genius ST could potentially be improved. By running more sag (I’m guessing towards the 35% setting) the Genius could be made to be more compliant and comfortable for the standard trail riding, with that Ramp Control mode on tap to dial up the capability for the rowdiest terrain and biggest hits, and the Climb mode to regain the efficiency for ascending. I wasn’t able to test this theory during the media camp, so I’m eager to get my long term test rig to find out if my theory is correct, and will be sure to report back in the full review. With the standard setup, there was never the demand for such a system, as both the pedaling and descending performance was stiff enough in the Descend mode. Through flowier, smoother sections of singletrack the Genius was an absolute delight, with the stout feeling and support in the rear end making it easy to keep the trail speed high by working the trail at every opportunity.

First Ride and Release: The New Scott Genius

The build spec on the Genius proved to be stellar for the 2-day testing period we’ve had so far as you’d expect, but given the quality of the components present on this top-spec ST 900 Tuned, you’d hope that they’ll be good for the long haul too. The bike ran quiet and rattle-free aside from the occasional bit of chain noise, which was no mean feat with the relentlessly dusty trails and flat out high frequency bumps on the descents. With no need to get involved with any of the cable routing or dive into the frame hardware it’s hard to say for sure how much complexity they’ll add for the home mechanic, but any issues we have will be covered in the long term review coming to the site soon.

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